Ok, weird, in just the last 15 minutes or so since I pulled it out of the garage and into the driveway, the leak has Stopped!

It was leaking when I first put it in the driveway, but not anymore.
My drive way is on a slope, so the front end of the car is higher than the rear now.

Perhaps it was a overfilling of the tank?

The way it was dripping it would make me nervous to drive, if that gas dripped on the hot exhaust. Remember, I have duals, so there is a tail pipe on that side. I don't know if it's really a concern though, I had a 76 Camaro in High School, driving from Kentucky to Ohio it lost power and died. Then started back up, but I saw the fuel pump was leaking, I had to drive it about an hour to get it back to my girlfriends father's house to fix the next day. This was in the engine compartment, no problems.

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Sam Woodson

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Sam,

Filling up suggests the tank overflow system has some bad hoses. There are two connecting to the neck of the tank. The hoses connect to plastic connections on the tank. The hoses are often difficult to remove. Typically, when I find a hose difficult to remove I slice the hose with a utility knife. This is a good method on connections that are metal, but with the tank it is very easy to slice trough the plastic on the tank too.

The factory hoses are fabric covered rubber hoses. They rot over time.
There are better hoses available at the auto parts store. When I replaced my tank on the convertible I used all after market hoses.

The smaller hose on the front of the filler goes to the vapor recovery system. The bigger hose on the back of the filler is redirected to the tank at a lower level and goes through the frame of the car. The bigger hose is there to equalize the pressure while filling the tank. Without it or if it gets kinked it becomes very difficult to fill up the tank completely.

Good luck

Dan the Pod Guy
Portia's Parts